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Sedating over the counter

Also available are quick-dissolving tablets, which are marketed as being faster to get into one's circulatory system, but require special handling to avoid degrading in the package.Patients with severe hepatic (liver) disorders may need to start with a lower dose.For example, when you're fighting a cold (the rhinovirus), histamines widen the blood vessels in your nasal cavity, causing nasal congestion.

They act on histamine receptors in the brain and spinal cord and in the rest of the body (called the periphery).

They also act on muscarinic, alpha-adrenergic, and serotonin receptors.

They act on histamine-1 receptors in the periphery and are unlikely to penetrate the brain, so are less likely to cause side effects or interact with drugs.

Most second-generation antihistamines do not cause drowsiness, although some (such as cetirizine and fexofenadine), may be more likely to do so at higher dosages.

When you get injured or your immune system detects a potentially dangerous foreign substance, certain white blood cells and tissue cells release histamines that seek out and attach to other cells that have a histamine receptor.

Here, the histamines induce an inflammatory response — they dilate the blood vessels, increasing blood flow to the site of injury or invasion.This means that first-generation antihistamines are more likely to cause side effects such as sedation, dry mouth, dizziness, low blood pressure, and a rapid heart-beat.They are also more likely than second-generation antihistamines to impair a person’s ability to drive or operate machinery.They can cross the blood-brain barrier and inhibit one of the other functions of histamines — that is, the pivotal role they play in regulating sleep and wakefulness.This disruption of the action of histamines in the brain results in drowsiness.Histamine-1 receptors are also found in the brain and spinal cord.Antihistamines are very good at relieving symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as: First-generation antihistamines were developed more than seventy years ago and are still in widespread use today.Antihistamines are a class of agents that block histamine release from histamine-1 receptors and are mostly used to treat allergies or cold and flu symptoms, although some first-generation antihistamines may also be used for other conditions.Histamine-1 receptors are located in the airways, blood vessels and gastrointestinal tract (stomach and esophagus).They also make blood vessels more permeable, allowing proteins and white blood cells to seep into the damaged or infected tissue.But there are side effects to this healing process.

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